Overcoming self-doubt

Harish Kumar (name changed) had first contacted the Eyeway Helpdesk in 2013.  Due to his gradual loss of vision he had become disillusioned and wanted to discontinue his studies post his class 10th examination three years ago. Our counselor advised him to complete his education and at the same time shared inspirational stories of visually impaired people who have achieved despite their disability. Encouraged by our guidance Harish was thus motivated and has completed his class 12th successfully since then. This October he again reached out to the Helpdesk seeking information on scholarship schemes. He informed us that he is currently pursuing B.Ed in Dr. Shakunthala University. This has proved to be a milestone in his life, since three years ago he was disillusioned and today he is an inspiration to many to not give up hope and to strive better generic levitra online cheap.

Technology to the rescue

Priya, a 32 year old housewife and mother of three, began losing her eyesight a few years ago. She was diagnosed with low vision which over time only became worse. She got in touch with our helpdesk seeking information on how she could cope with this loss of sight. Our counselors provided her with information on the available technologies and resources that would enable her to adapt to her eye condition. She was told about screen reader and other apps that would ensure that she could continue using her laptop and mobile phone. She was thankful to our counselors for providing her this information as she was completely unaware about these available technologies and resources. She was keen to resume her everyday tasks and get back to life. We also guided her to the Eyeway website where she would have access to additional information about living life with blindness.

Reaching out

Manoj (name changed) a 30 year old resident of  Siliguri  West Bengal, recently got in touch with the Eyeway Helpdesk to share concerns about his future. After completing his tenth standard, he started losing his vision, due to which he was unable to continue his studies. Our counselor Dominic Roy advised him to enrol in an open school so that he can complete his basic studies and given his age and need for means of livelihood, connected him with Blind Relief Association Delhi. The Blind Relief Association focuses on providing education and training to the visually challenged, enabling them to realize their potential through vocational programs and mobility training. After receiving guidance and counseling Manoj has a clearer vision about his future.  Sometime back he called to inform us about his progress and shared that he is going to begin his vocational training program in Blind Relief Association, Delhi.

Pursuing your dreams

One young man who connected with our helpdesk recently has a similar story of hope triumphing despair. Manish, a 22 year visually impaired student from Punjab had recently completed his B.Com.  He had an idea, a dream and a hope in his mind. He had always been interested in and had wanted to study law. However, he had a mental block regarding his capability to achieve this dream. He shared that he was very doubtful if he could ever get the opportunity to study law due to his visual impairment.  Our counselor assured Manish that there was no legal ground for him to be denied admission into a law programme just because of his visual impairment. We motivated him to apply for admission and to prepare well for the exams. After putting in a lot of effort into the preparation and application process, he recently shared with us an amazing piece of news. Manish finally fulfilled his dream of becoming a law student. He got admission into the prestigious Law Department at Punjab University and is currently studying there. We would like to thank our counselor Ankita Bhuteja of Navchetna for sharing this story.

Reclaiming life

Vijay, aged 22, lost his eyesight soon after he completed 11th standard. This prevented him from continuing his education and left him feeling depressed and helpless. The fact that he belonged to a lower economic background just made matters worse. After having spent almost 3 years at home he finally heard our radio advertisement and contacted our helpdesk, desperate for a solution to his problems. He was made aware of the fact that life does not end with blindness and that there were many options he had to take his life forward. Since he was not eligible for the computer training courses, he was instead suggested vocational and rehabilitation courses that he could enroll in at NAB, M.P. He was informed of the mobility programs that would help him move around with ease.

Empowerment through technology

Nineteen year old Rakesh, a resident of Ramgarh, Jharkhand, found out about the Eyeway Helpdesk through a friend. He called the helpdesk curious to know whether a visually impaired person could operate a computer. Not only did our counselors assure Rakesh of this possibility they also shared with him information about the many available software and apps that enabled visually impaired persons to access computers, smart phones, books. Rakesh, having shown interest in gaining some computer skills, was guided to the National Association for Blind (NAB), Jamshedhpur. He has gotten in touch with NAB and hopes to join a computer training program soon.

Demonetization Blues

Govt needs to ensure that the recent demonetization does not lead to financial exclusion of the blind and visually impaired citizens

If the recent demonetization of 1000 and 500 rupee notes has to be made into a success for all sections of society then one needs to pay attention to the below listed red flags as far as persons with blindness and visual impairment are concerned. A cashless digital economy may imply near financial exclusion of the blind population from the mainstream economy. Read more

Overcoming disability through a positive attitude towards life

By Shruti Pushkarna

Visual impairment is not in the eyes, it’s in the mind. If you will feel that you are visually impaired then you will not be able to do anything. You need to go out of the way to explore the world.

Says Chetna Nagpal, who was born with an eye condition called Nystagmus. It is a condition of involuntary eye movement that may result in reduced or limited vision. In her case, Chetna can see things but is unable to focus on anything. But unlike many, Chetna does not find her disability to be limiting. She believes visual impairment is more of a mental condition than a physical one.
A 21 year old ambitious young woman, she is studying in her first year Political Science major in one of India’s top colleges, Lady Shri Ram College for Women. Born to totally blind parents, Chetna did not have it easy while growing up. Chetna’s parents did not know she could see at all until the age where she started to talk and point out things to them. Read more

Hospital to Hospit-able: How hospitals can overcome inaccessibility

By Anoushka Mathews

Most government hospitals in Delhi, despite being spaces for diagnosis and recovery, are teeming with lines, unending paper work, and tired patients. The wait is long for those who do not have an uncle or cousin working at the hospital. However, for those who are visually impaired, even basic access to hospital services and facilities is possible only through dependence or great strife.

Imagine being visually impaired and visiting the hospital alone. The obstacle course begins even before entering the hospital. The only way to locate the main gate is to rely on a helpful passerby. On arriving at the main entrance, again, the only way to proceed further is to depend on directions from a guard or a fellow patient. Many are not trained to provide such assistance, and may provide instructions that might not make much sense to a person who is blind or visually impaired. Read more

World Disability Day Musings

By George Abraham

Every blind Indian is potentially a part of the Human Resource of the country. They must be invested in and not merely provided for. The nation needs to realize this as much as the government, the society, the families and the blind person himself or herself needs to realize this. There is a huge potential which we need to recognize, nurture and tap into. Read more